Johan Wilhelm Diehl

Johan Wilhelm Diehl[1, 2, 3, 4]

Male 1717 - Bef 1790  (72 years)

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  • Name Johan Wilhelm Diehl 
    Born 13 Dec 1717  Horschbach, Germany, ZIP 6799 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died Bef. Jun 1790  Canover, Lincoln County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • The Catawba River Valley, Rowan County NC, became in 1777: Burke County NC, and became in 1779: Lincoln County NC, and finally in 1842: Catawba County, NC.
    Buried St. Pauls Lutheran Church Cemetery, Catawba County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Pennsylvania Census, 1772-1890, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, 1768: "Johan Wilhelm Diehl." [no other identification]

    • http://genforum.genealogy.com/deal/messages/1747.html

      "Two large DEAL/DIEHL families both claim as their immigrant ancestor the WILLIAM DIEHL, age 19, who arrived in Philadelphia on 9 SEPT 1738 on the ship "Glasgow." One (or both) of these claims must be wrong.

      1. North Carolina Deals. The 1939 book by ROM DEAL and KELSIE DEAL, "Deal-Stafford Genealogical History" claims that this William Diehl left Bucks County, PA and moved to Newton, Lincoln County, NC. No supporting evidence is presented. However there is ample evidence of a large migration from Bucks and Northampton Counties, PA to NC in the 1760s. At least two branches of the NC Deals are proven to be from PA (Diehl-Bolich family and Jacob Deal of Rowan County in the 1850 US Census), but neither is proven to be a child OF THIS 1738 William Diehl.

      . . . To further confuse the issue [of the identity of William Deal], some people have linked the 1738 William Diehl to a William Diehl, b. circa 1719, of Horspach, Germany. There WAS a William Diehl in Horspach/Horshbach, born in 1717, who applied for and received permission to emigrate to America with his brother Jacob Diehl, but that was in 1742, NOT 1738. They do not appear in any of the surviving ship lists for Philadelphia for 1742 (but their destination was not necessarily Philadelphia)."

      U.S. & Canada Immigration Lists, 1500s-1900s: "Johan Jacob Diehl & brother, Johan William, arrived America [sic] 1742."

    • http://history.loftinnc.com/Sherrill_Adam_1697.htm

      Hickory Daily Record, Centennial Edition, Saturday, 6 Jun 1970

      "Adam Sherrill Family First to Arrive; Crossed Into Valley In 1747, by Pamela Whitener

      On August 2, 1929, at a spot now covered by the waters of Lake Norman, the descendants of the founder of Catawba County's earliest permanent settlement erected on a boulder a monument inscribed with these words:

      'This boulder commemorates the crossing of the Catawba River by Adam Sherrill, the Pioneer, with his eight sons and others in 1747 at the ford which bears his name. Erected by his descendants, August 2, 1929.'

      Just A Wilderness

      At the time of Sherrill's arrival, the Catawba River valley was a wilderness inhabited by the Catawba Indians and stragglers from the Cherokee nation. It was at that time officially a part of the crown colony of North Carolina?s Bladen County, a large area covering all the western part of the state, and having no definite boundary in the west. Exploration of the colonies was as such an early stage in that new counties in the Southern coastal colonies were designated simply as extending to the 'South Seas,' or Pacific Ocean, until bounded by the formation of another county. Sherrill crossed the river at what is now southeastern Catawba County, near the present-day Sherrill's Ford community.

      The Sherrill party was fairly large. It was headed by Adam's father, William Sherrill, Sr., and included Adam, his brother William, their families and others. Included in the party was a fourteen-year-old youth to become well-known later as 'Gentleman' John Perkins, a hunter and guide of wide reputation. Some historians think that Henrich Weidner, another well-know pioneer and founder of Catawba County's numerous Whitener clan, may have made his first trip into the area with the Sherrill party.

      Brought Negros Along

      The Sherrills are thought to be the first to bring slaves into the area, as accounts of the expedition mentions two Negro brothers, twins, who aided in the building of the Adam Sherrill home. There is also mention of a Negro servant, Saul, who aided in the crossing at Sherrills Ford. . . ."



    Person ID I7980  Complete
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2013 

    Father Johan Simon Thiel,   b. Horschbach, Germany, [1985 ZIP: 6799] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Anna Elizabetha Biber,   b. Welchweiler, Germany, [1985 ZIP: 6799] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 17 Jan 1702 
    Documents
    Horschbach [1985 ZIP: 6799] area of Germany
    Horschbach [1985 ZIP: 6799] area of Germany
    Family ID F6157  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary Ann Elizabeth Cosby,   b. Abt. 1722, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft. 1767, Rowan County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 46 years) 
    Married Abt. 1742  Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. William Deal,   b. 8 Jun 1742, Berks County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Nov 1789, Lincoln County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years)
    +2. Jacob Deal,   b. Abt. 1743, Bucks County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef. 1812, Lincoln County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 69 years)
    +3. John Deal,   b. Abt. 1746, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt. 1800, Burke County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 54 years)
     4. Catherine Deal,   b. Abt. 1752, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt.1768, Prob. Rowan County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 16 years)
    +5. George Wilhelm Deal,   b. Abt. 1755, Somerset, Somerset County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt. 1815, Lincoln County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 60 years)
    +6. Maria Magdalena Deal,   b. 15 Aug 1756, Northampton, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Nov 1839, Lincoln County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     7. Michael Deal,   b. Abt. 1760, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef. 12 Sep 1781, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 21 years)
    +8. Mary Elizabeth Deal,   b. Abt. 1763, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location
    +9. Peter Deal,   b. 7 May 1770, Berks County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt. 1828, Lincoln County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     10. Alexander Deal,   b. Abt.1777
    Last Modified 12 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F5843  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 13 Dec 1717 - Horschbach, Germany, zip 6799 Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Abt. 1742 - Pennsylvania Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Bef. Jun 1790 - Canover, Lincoln County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - St. Pauls Lutheran Church Cemetery, Catawba County, North Carolina, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Headstones
    Old St Pauls Luthurn Church and Cemetery photo of site
    Old St Pauls Luthurn Church and Cemetery photo of site

    Johan Wilhelm Diehl is thought to be buried behind the old church in the photo. There are many William Deals and other Deals buried in Catawba County cemeteries, but not one Diehl, so the whole clan must have adopted an anglicized version of Diehl.

    Roy Richard Thomas June 2007

    Histories
    Old St Paul and Cemetery in bloom
    Old St Paul and Cemetery in bloom

    This is an official history of the church compiled by Rev. Luther Knuaff
    'Old St. Paul's Church:  Catawba County's Oldest By Far'
    "Old St. Paul's Church: Catawba County's Oldest By Far"

    By Anne Huffman

    Copy of article in "Hickory Daily Record," June 6, 1970 - Reprinted Sunday, March 26, 2006
    Horschbach, Germany
    Horschbach, Germany
    Historical and Background of the City and Near By Cities
    This is directly taken from a much more complete Wikipedia Article which can be visited by
    Clicking on This Link

  • Sources 
    1. [S24] Eighteenth Century Emigrants, Annette Kunselman Burgert, (The Pennsylvania German Society, 1986), 88-93.

      Annette Kunselman Burgert provided detailed information which she transcribed from religious records and local histories in Germany as well as data (often sparse) that she found in Pennsylvania.

      "101. DIEHL, Johan Jacob--1742; DIEHL, Johan Wilhelm--1742; DIEHL, Johan Philip--1744.

      EUROPEAN RECORDS. Hinzweiler Reformed KB. Johan Simon Thiel, son of Peter Thiel of Horspach [sic, old spelling; 1985 ZIP] 6799 Horschbach, m. 17 Jan 1702 Anna Elizabetha [Biber], daughter of the late Henrich Biber of [1985 ZIP] 6799 Welchweiler. They had:

      1. Johan Daniel b. 29 Dec 1702 m. 22 Feb 1724 Maria Catharina Geres
      2. Simon Peter b. 16 Sep 1706 m. 10 Jan 1730 Elizabetha Catharina [Cassel], daughter of late Peter Cassel
      3. Johan Phillip b. 17 Jan 1710 [subject of entry #101]
      4. Johan Michael ( q.v.) b. 9 Sept 1712 m. 22 Mar 1736 Maria Magdalena Dielmann
      5. Johan Jacob b. 8 Feb 1715 [subject of entry #101]
      6. Johan Wilhelm b. 13 Dec 1717 [subject of entry #101]
      7. Johan Adam b. 22 Mar 1720
      8. Maria Margretha Charlotta b. 14 May 1722
      9. Anna Catharina b. 20 May 1725
      10. Maria Margretha b. 18 Apr 1728

      ZMP: Lichtenberg
      1742: Jacob Dhiel [sic] and his brother Wilhelm Dhiel [sic] of Horspach [sic] move to America [No indication they were "single," but that fact may been ommitted by the compiler.]
      1744: Philipp Dhiel [sic] of Horspach [sic], single, moves to America

      AMERICAN RECORDS. One Jacob Diehl, Upper Milford, Northanpton, PA naturalized, Fall 1765."

      Edited by Roy Richard Thomas May 2007


    2. [S37] Germans West of the Catawba, Lorena Shell Eaker, (Location: Tennessee;), GS 929.3756 E11., pp. 133, 185.
      p. 133:

      "Wilhelm Diehl/Deal [Abt. 1717-Bef. Jun 1790]

      (Eaker: What this writer has is a collection of notes without proof of where they belong.)

      Mechlenburg County, NC Deed Book 4:491-3, 27 Feb 1768 William Diehl/Deal [Abt. 1717-Bef. Jun 1790] bought 400 acres on Clarks Creek from Nicholas Fry. (Eaker: Perhaps the father-in-law of William Deal, Jr.[1742-1789]?)"

      [Tryon County, NC was formed in 1768 from Mecklenburg County. Tryon County was abolished in 1779 and Lincoln and Rutherford Counties were formed from it.]

      p. 185: "Phillip Henry Grader received 12 Sep 1772 60 acres on branch of Clarks Creek, Lincoln County, NC Deed Book 1:659, which he deeded to Henry Bollinger, Nicholas Fry, Peter Eigart, John Shuford, Martin Coulter, Frederick Markle, Michael Grindstaff, William Deal [Abt. 1717-Bef. Jun 1790], and John Deal for a school and meeting house on 25 May 1773, Lincoln County, NC Deed Book 1:713-4."

      p. 133: "Lincoln, NC Deed Book 1:713, 25 May 1773 William Diehl [Abt. 1717-Bef. Jun 1790] and John Diehl lived on Clarks Creek

      1788 John Deal was on road committee

      Lincoln, NC Deed Book 16:105, 30 Jun 1790 Rudolph Conrad and John Hasselberer, Excrs. of William Deal [Abt. 1717-Bef. Jun 1790], deceased, sold 400 acreas on Clark's Creek granted 28 Oct 1782

      (Eaker: One note says he was b. 8 Jun 1742 Maryland d. 16 Nov 1789 NC. This writer [Eaker] suspects the birth date has been confused with what must be [that of] William, Jr.)"

      Edited by Roy Richard Thomas August 2007

    3. [S42] A Religious History of the American People, Sydney E. Ahlstrom, (New Haven CT: Yale University Press, 1972, 1158 PP.)), Ch. 16, "The German Reformed and Lutheran Churches.", (pp. 245-247).
      "The political history of the German-speaking regions of Europe in the centuries following the Reformation is an incredibly complex tangle. . . . Ecclesiastical division compounded [political] complications . . . because confessional loyalties were fiercely debated. . . .

      The German Reformed Church. The distinct German Reformed tradition which came into existence both as a theology and as a political force naturally owed much to the Reformation in German Switzerland, above all to Zwingli and Bullinger of Zurich. . . . In this unsettled state of affairs, serious economic dislocations and continual outbreaks of religious persecution led great numbers of harassed peoples of every religious affiliation to seek haven in America. . . .

      The German Reformed Church in America. The planting of the German Reformed church in Pennsylvania was one result of these upheavals. By 1730 it was estimated that the German Reformed church had fifteen thousand potential adherents in Pennsylvania. The bulk of the immigration came from the provinces of the Rhineland; indeed, so many Palatines came to America that the word became almost a synonym for 'German.' Many came as 'redemptioners,' indentured as servants for a stipulated length of time in repayment for their passage. Because very few of them moved as organized religious groups, they lacked a ministry. Like many others who came to America out of state churches in Europe, moreover, they were habituated to having ecclesiastical matters ordered by the authorities, and were ill-prepared to take them into their own hands. The primitive state of the country and the dispersion of the people were also obstacles to organized church life and support of a regular ministry. . . . A 'founder' of a German Reformed congregation, therefore, would be faced with a difficult task. . . ."
      Edited by Roy Richard Thomas Sep 2007

    4. [S44] ROOTSWEB.COM, (INTERNET), http://www.rootsweb.com/~nccatawb/ccgsfam.htm .
      "Settlement in present-day Catawba County began after 1740, during the period before and after the French & Indian Wars [1754-1763]. The early pioneers made land claims to the Crown (under the then current governor) in Bladen county until 1750, when the area of the Catawba Valley became Anson county. During the "Indian Wars," in 1753, Rowan became the new county seat. The early pioneers to the Catawba Valley were virtually isolated from the supply trains from Pennsylvania during the frequent raids from 1754-1762. Indeed, there was much depradation on the Carolina frontier before the end of the war. From then until the 1790's the Great Wagon Road carried an increasing volume of southern bound traffic.

      The Catawba Valley became Burke county in 1777, right in the middle of the Revolutionary War. Two years later, in 1779, before the war really came to western North Carolina with a fury, the Catawba Valley became Lincoln county. The Battles at Ramsours Mill, Cowpens, and King's Mountain would pave the road to British collapse in the American Colonies.

      Those settling in the Catawba Valley were originally of two distinct communities: Those speaking German and those speaking English. The Palatine Germans and Swiss generally found land to their liking in the northern portion of the county which resembled the ridges and rolling hills of their homeland. For the most part, the Scot-Irish and English settlers formed the communities in the south-east part of the county."

      Edited by Roy Richard Thomas August 2007